One of the most universally accepted pieces of advice is probably “respect your elders.” Even though kids tend to treat their parents like garbage once they reach their teens, acknowledging the fact that those who have been through it know something about getting through it is essential to success. Of course there are exceptions to this rule when it comes to individuals, but in reality by taking any kind of learning seriously, you are respecting your elders on some level. All most all learning comes from teachers, who almost always your elder, or books written by your elder. If you can’t find a way to respect the people who came before you, you won’t learn anything, but the best part about that is the opposite holds true as well. If you show them respect you can learn about anything….even raving.

1. Take Care Of Yourself

Although its very common for the thirty year olds at a festival to be going absolutely bananas, the reason they are able to do that is because they are generally conscious of their health. That may sound like a hypocritical statement, but even if that person spends the night doing things that are very unhealthy, they’ll be able to come back next year because when they aren’t dancing to the music, they’re taking care of themselves. If they don’t I’m sure that’ll be the one of the last times you see them there. You definitely don’t have to start eating vegan or anything like that, but it’s good to pick up a salad every once in a while.

2. Dedication

If you want to sustain any kind of activity that isn’t related to necessities (eating, drinking, etc.) it requires some level of dedication. Unfortunately as we age, the number of responsibilities we must recognize increases, and every one of those makes raving that much more difficult. As much as you want to party all night, if you don’t have a car you can drive back, or a house to come home to, it’s hard to justify said partying. To keep raving you have find a way to make it happen, and that’s what the OGs have done. Whether it’s pinching enough pennies to hit one festival a year or integrating dance music into their source of income, raving is more than a hobby for them, it’s a priority.

3. Open Your Mind

All too often you hear people complain about the way things used to be. Everyone idealizes the past, but unfortunately some festival goers have a tendency to worship it. They remember their first festival experience and how it changed their lives, and in turn want every festival ever to be like that. At the source of this historical reverence is a closed mind; a mind that can’t accept change. Sorry, but the only constant is change. When used as a noun, the word “constant” applies to everything. That includes raves. Of course the scene is different than it was when you first became a part of it. If you want to stay raving that’s something you will have to accept, but I’m sure it’s much better to embrace it.

4. Be Yourself

If there’s one central theme in dance music, I’d say those two words sum it up just right. Being yourself is probably the most important part of enjoying yourself at a festival. Sure loud music is cool, but last time I checked you can buy some pretty insane speakers at Best-Buy that’ll get pretty close, and you can listen to them all you want at home. The reason loud music is essential to these events is because it gives the listener an opportunity to express who they are. Remember that older guy dancing you’ve seen at a festival dancing like a maniac? I can assure you he doesn’t give a damn what the weirded out teenagers think. Other than that reflex gradually fading age, that guy has been raving for plenty of years. Let’s just say he knows how to be himself. An important thing to remember though is that being yourself doesn’t mean going crazy. Don’t be afraid to stand in the back and chill by yourself if that’s you’re thing. As long as you’re being true to yourself, you’ll have a great time, and that’s something that doesn’t fade with age.

5. Remember The Important Stuff

Yes, the scene is vastly different than it was, but at the end of the day, the reason the events are still called raves years later is because the important stuff stayed the same. The music still kicks, the lights are still low, and you still have the freedom to be yourself. What more could you ask for? When an OG sees EDC and thinks back to his/her first warehouse party, they remember how much they had getting down to some tunes in the dark.

It might look different, but that stuff is still there, and as long as they don’t give raves some other name, it’ll always be there.