The phrase, “A Breath Of Fresh Air” can be used to describe many things besides an actual breath of fresh air.

Inherently the phrase depicts enjoyment because, let’s be real, who doesn’t love a breath of fresh air?

More importantly, the phrase also a depiction of relief.

Put in literal context, the most effective use of the phrase would come after someone spent 10 hours on a plane stuck between two travelers who are as rotund as they are flatulent. In that case, that first inhale when you get off the plane is both literally and figuratively a breath of fresh air.

Now for the figurative context.

Once I heard Annie Mac describe the music of Disclosure as “a breath of fresh air” on her radio show. It that context, the figurative rotund and flatulent travelers were mainstream EDM, and we were stuck right in the middle of that for much longer than 10 hours.

One of the reasons EDM blew up the way it did is because of how easy it was to get the music from the producer to their fanbase. Tracks took less time to produce than ever and a few clicks later it would be available to all of your Soundcloud followers. People were getting so much EDM delivered right to their homepage that soon it became overwhelming.

Then Disclosure came along and, just like their fellow British predecessors, changed everything. They took the equation of EDM (dance/club music + pop music + party = EDM) and replaced the party with a healthy dose of soul, funk, and disco.

Disclosure intended for their music to be pop music first and club music second, but their ability to effortlessly incorporate club beats into their pop music is what really gave everyone the much-needed relief from EDM. People were still very interested in dance music, but they wanted a new perspective on it that wasn’t just about getting turnt.

And because they paired those club beats with a plethora of different influences, their success allowed for dozens of musicians to gain attention for exploring multiple influences as well.

These are just a few of those musicians.

1. Jacques Greene

Jacques Greene may not be radio famous or anything close to it, but it’s very likely that those of you with a penchant for creative house music would have heard of him. In the same manner that Disclosure incorporated club beats into their rendition of pop music, Greene incorporated club beats into his rendition of hip hop and R&B. A majority of his tracks reject the standard four-on-the-floor style of house music, and all of his tracks feature an eerie yet soulful presence that goes bone-deep.

2. Todd Terje

Another artist that house-heads are probably already familiar with, Todd Terje is far from a newcomer on the scene. The reason he’s on this list is because many Disclosure fans assume that the two British brothers were the first one to bring authentic funk and house together. Well a quick look back in time would reveal that they are incorrect in this particular case. Todd Terje definitely wasn’t the first to do it either, but through the application of his live band the Olsens, his music is very similar to Disclosure. It’s groovy. It’s funky. It’s house-y. It can be performed 100 percent live. Sounds like a spot-on match for Disclosure fans.

3. Jessy Lanza

Of course it’s important to recognize Disclosure’s effect on dance music, but its equally important to recognize their effect on soul, disco, R&B, and the numerous other genres Disclosure has drawn from. Jessy Lanza is a prime example of how all of these can come together with an electronic foundation. Her latest album “Oh No” isn’t entirely upbeat dance-tracks, but then again neither is “Caracal.”

4. Toomy Disco

If all you think about when the word “Disclosure” is mentioned is funky house music, you have to check this guy out.

5. Zak Abel

I first heard of this guy when he was featured on Gorgon City’s house, ballad “Unmissable”. Given that Gorgon City would be the first recommendation for fans of Disclosure if they didn’t already have their own huge following, it’s more than likely that singers they featured fall into the same musical umbrella as both Disclosure and GC. Well not only does Zak Abel’s music have all the bells and whistles that a Disclosure fanatic would want, but because he’s at the center of the music, his voice is allowed to shine through unlike it ever has when he was simply being featured by someone else. This particular track was produced by a Kaytranada as well, who has collaborated with Disclosure in the past.