Looks like it’s only getting more difficult for the Los Angeles rave scene, with new guidelines being implemented for concerts and festivals taking place at venues owned by taxpayers. Electronic music events, as well as other massive musical gatherings, have come under a lot of scrutiny again in LA following the deaths of 3 young attendees in the past 2 years.

The latest regulations involve an assessment team that will consist of fire, sheriff’s, medical, public health and other LA county officials deciding whether events anticipating 10,000 people or more will be open to attendees 18- or 21-and-older. In addition, that same team will make a “threat assessment” that will consider the event’s size and the possibility of drug use, medical emergencies and other risks. Promotors will be required to submit their plans 120 days prior to the event date, after which the team will determine whether “there is a strong probability that loss of life or harm to the participants could occur.” In that case, promotors will have 60 days to develop an “event action plan” that may limit or prohibit alcohol sales, set age limits, set earlier closing times and/or add further medical and security precautions. From there, county officials will have the final say regarding approval.

“Protecting the health and safety of L.A. County residents and visitors attending mass gatherings at our County Fairgrounds, and parks and recreation spaces is the overarching goal,” Supervisor Hilda Solis said. And while it may be easier to gripe about the negative impact this ordinance will have on LA’s music scene, it’s important to remember the 2 teenagers who lost their lives at HARD Summer 2015 just last August. As well as the teen who lost her life at HARD Summer 2014, and the 15-year old who died at the Coliseum in 2010 prompting Insomniac‘s Electric Daisy Carnival to move it’s location to Las Vegas. The risks to those who don’t rave responsibly will always exist, but implementing certain precautionary strategies will certainly help to minimize those risks.

Source: LA Weekly